Motion Stability's Blog


What Exercises Can Help to Alleviate My Lower Back Pain? by charlestlee

image source: lakeviewchiropractic.net

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

Usually low grade/oscillatory exercises can help alleviate low back pain. This includes stretches such as knees to chest, knees side to side/trunk rotation, prone press ups (like a Cobra position in yoga), pelvic tilts/clocks. Please consult with a qualified health practitioner to assess your causes of low back pain to then develop a proper exercise program.

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Play Golf? Avoid Lower Back Pain With These Stretches. by charlestlee

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

There are numerous studies that have come out recently that show the loss of lead leg internal rotation of the hip in the golf swing has a high prevelance of low back pain in golfers. This is due to the lead leg in the golf swing acting as your swivel / finishing point in the swing. With limitations in the hip, the back has to work harder to finsh the swing. 

You should work on the foam roll to loosen the lead leg hip musculature, knee to chest and pirformis stretches can also help.

Standard back stretches can help alleviate your back after golf, but consider the causitive reasons why your back is hurting in the first place. I work at a Nike Golf Performance Center called Terminus Club (www.terminusclub.com) we utilize 3D Motion Capture Reality systems to analyze your swing, as well as utilize a Physical Therapist to determine the physical limitations of the body. From there we tailor your swing based upon who you are as an individual and not just the way a PGA Tour swings.



How Is Rehabilitation Used to Treat Neck and Back Pain? by charlestlee

In Physical Therapy we treat neck and back pain by the following interventions:

1. Examination: Take a thorough subjective and physical examination to determine the causes and severity of pain. The examination helps determine what specific interventions need to be done. Each patient is unique in the medical history and interventions should also be individualized to the patient’s progress.

2. Reduce Pain: Especially in more severe pain complaints, it is important to reduce the symptoms to allow for the patient to simply feel less pain. This can include manual therapy to decrease muscle spasms, restricted joint mobility, or decrease nerve irritation. Modalities such as ultrasound, electrical stimulation and traction can also be used.

3. Restore Motion: As pain decreases, it is the goal for rehabilitation specialists to restore patients back to their functional activities. Mobility / range of motion is important to allow the patient to move again. Manual therapy, exercises including stretches and stability training, posture and gait/walking education are all necessary to improve the patient.

4. Improve Stability and Strength: In the neck and back there are key muscles that are designed to stabilize the spine, while others provide power and torque. In chronic pain conditions, it is important to improve the efficiency of muscle function rather than just ‘get people stronger’. Such muscles as the longus colli in the neck, shoulder blade / scapular stabilizers – such as the lower trapezius, or trunk stabilizers -including the transversus abdominis, multifidus, obliques, and gluteal muscles are all necessary to provide proper stability for dynamic function. Rehabilitation specialists have strategies to improve the stability of these muscles.

5. Function / Sports Specific Training: Once basic stability has been established, it is important to provide the patient the tools to return to full work, functional, and sports-related activities.



Stretches for lower back pain? by charlestlee

image source: teraputics.com

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

The most common muscle that is strained on the side of your back is the quadratus lumborum (QL). The QL attaches from the side and bottom of your rib cage to the top of your pelvis. There is a right and left QL and when it contracts its side bends your spine, as well as extends the back.

Lets say your right QL feels tight – to stretch this:

1. While sitting place a thick book or half foam roll under your opposite / left hip.

2. Lean to the left, away from your painful side, fulcruming over the roll and left hip.

3. Slightly bend forward and rotate towards the right. Keep your right hip bone on the seat.

4. You should feel a nice stretch on the right side where the QL muscle is.

This stretch should not cause increased back pain or nerve symptoms down the leg. Please consult with a qualified health practitioner to display proper technique.



What stretches should I do before I workout so I do not get back pain? by charlestlee
Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT
There are many stretches you can do to help loosen your back up before you work out. Please keep in mind  that stretching does not guarantee that your back will not hurt – as there other causes of back pain than just tight muscles. Some light stretches you can do to loosen your back include:
Pelvic tilts: Laying on your back with knees  bent – rock your pelvis back – flattening your back against the bed and return to neutral, and if it doesn’t bother you progress to arching your back a small amount. Oscillate back and forth.
Knee to chest: Bring one knee up to your chest, stretching your hip and your back. You can progress to both knees to your chest.
Trunk rotation: Laying on your back with knees bent and together slowly let your knees go to one side – allowing your trunk to rotate. Switch to the other side. If that does not bother you, you can progress to have one leg straight and let the other knee hook over it allowing the spine to rotate more. There should be a slow stretch in your spine.
Cat / Camels: On you hand and knees – you can arch your low back up and down. Focus on a slow stretch trying to move from your lower back and pelvis. Many times people arch their
backs but move mostly from the mid-back or thoracic spine, which does not stretch the lower back as well.
Prayer stretch: On your hand and knees – sit your bottom down to your heels and reach out along the ground with your arms to stretch your lower back. Take your arms and trunk side to side to feel more of a stretch along your sides of your back as well.
Please consult with a qualified health practitioner such as a Physical Therapist to recommend the proper stretches and form.