Motion Stability's Blog


How Is Rehabilitation Used to Treat Neck and Back Pain? by charlestlee

In Physical Therapy we treat neck and back pain by the following interventions:

1. Examination: Take a thorough subjective and physical examination to determine the causes and severity of pain. The examination helps determine what specific interventions need to be done. Each patient is unique in the medical history and interventions should also be individualized to the patient’s progress.

2. Reduce Pain: Especially in more severe pain complaints, it is important to reduce the symptoms to allow for the patient to simply feel less pain. This can include manual therapy to decrease muscle spasms, restricted joint mobility, or decrease nerve irritation. Modalities such as ultrasound, electrical stimulation and traction can also be used.

3. Restore Motion: As pain decreases, it is the goal for rehabilitation specialists to restore patients back to their functional activities. Mobility / range of motion is important to allow the patient to move again. Manual therapy, exercises including stretches and stability training, posture and gait/walking education are all necessary to improve the patient.

4. Improve Stability and Strength: In the neck and back there are key muscles that are designed to stabilize the spine, while others provide power and torque. In chronic pain conditions, it is important to improve the efficiency of muscle function rather than just ‘get people stronger’. Such muscles as the longus colli in the neck, shoulder blade / scapular stabilizers – such as the lower trapezius, or trunk stabilizers -including the transversus abdominis, multifidus, obliques, and gluteal muscles are all necessary to provide proper stability for dynamic function. Rehabilitation specialists have strategies to improve the stability of these muscles.

5. Function / Sports Specific Training: Once basic stability has been established, it is important to provide the patient the tools to return to full work, functional, and sports-related activities.

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Can Strengthening your neck muscles prevent headaches? by charlestlee

Image Source: healthyliving.azcentral.com

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

There are different types of headaches. One common type is called a cerivcogenic headaches or neck-related headaches. There is lot of research coming out of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia that has discovered how proper stabilization of the neck muscles can reduce neck pain, whiplash injuries, and cervicogenic headaches.

Proper stability of the neck muscles comes first from the smaller muscles closest to the spine. This includes a wafer thin muscle on the front of the cervical spine called the longus colli. A skilled Physical Therapist can instruct a patient how to contract this muscle in isolation and train its endurance. As the longus colli function improves it is important to incorporate strength of the larger muscles such as the sternocleidomastoid and posterior neck muscles to provide stability and strength for the neck to function during the day and in sport.

Cervicogenic headaches are typically generated from dysfunction of the upper neck vertebrae such as C1-3 vertebra levels. With poor postures or previous whiplash injuries the smaller muscles can weaken or inhibit leaving the joints vulnerable to injury due to lack of muscle support.

By improving proper muscle stability, the cervical vertebrae have better support and can last longer in prolonged postures and sporting activities. In turn, the prevalence of headaches can be reduced.