Motion Stability's Blog


What are the treatment options for back pain? by charlestlee
Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

Accurate diagnosis of the sources of back pain will indicate the type of treatment you should receive. However, after structural reasons of back pain have been ruled out (such as a herniated disc), the majority of patients are diagnosed with ‘non-specific low back pain’. 

What we find clinically is that traditional interventions such as medications and injections, although perhaps needed and based on a physician’s recommendation, provide short-term relief.

There is growing research and clinical attention on trying to diagnose or sub-group ‘non-specific low back pain’. This can include movement dysfunction, fascial restrictions, muscle control dysfunction, myofascial trigger points, psychosocial variables, pelvic pain, nerve referred pain, or internal/systemic issues such as referred pain from internal organs or hormonal/vitamin deficiencies.

It is important to find a clinician that is able to differentially diagnose the various contributing factors of back pain, and then be able to provide effective treatment for those sources – and then coordinate with other practitioners that can address other needed areas. Especially in chronic low back pain management, a multi-disciplinary team of health practitioners is usually needed.

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What conditions can lead to a ‘groin’ pull? by charlestlee

image source: buzzle.com

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

‘Groin pulls’ typically are due to over-compensation and poor mechanics in the legs and core stability. Groin pulls comprise mostly of the adductor muscles of the inner thigh. These injuries usually occur with sports that requie cutting, pivoting and side to side movement  such as soccer, lacrosse, and football. It can also occur in runners and cyclists when the hip is required to be used in situations like uphill terrain.

Strength deficits with these injuries are not necessarily in the adductor muscles, but instead from the posterior hip muscles – gluteus maximus and medius. The gluteus maximus and medius are the key stabilizing muscles for the hip to be able to plant and pivot off the leg. When the gluteal muscles are not strong enough to stabilize the hip, the adductor muscles are used to compensate. Anatomically, the adductor muscles are primarily designed to pull the hip inwards, but many people do not realize that the adductor muscles also have a role in extending the hip. As the gluteal muscles should extend the hip to push off, run, climb, the adductor muscles can be used instead – and with time groin strains occur due to overuse.

Groin pulls can also happen due to poor foot contact. Especially if someone is more flat footed or pronated, it causes the knee to draw inwards when you step through it. In this position, the adductor muscles are in a better mechanical advantage to stabilize the hip than the gluteal muscles. Again, groin pulls can occur due to repetition in a poorly aligned position.

Differential diagnosis of ‘sports hernia’, nerve referred pain – primarily from the obturator nerve, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, internal pain from the hip such as arthritis, or referred pain from your internal organs should also be considered as they all commonly refer to the groin.



Weakness is the core problem! by BCollier

Do you think you have a strong core?  The latest trending exercise for core enthusiasts is at Motion Stability! Redcord is  gaining popularity in the world of  wellness and with elite athletes as a strengthening appartaus which emphasizes perfect form and maximizes muscle specificity!  The advantages of redcord as an exercise also play a key role in the world of rehabilitation for the correction of movement dysfunctions found in musculoskeletal pain and chronic pain.

Redcord Training

Redcord was featured in a recent edition of Marie Claire magazine! Check out the article here:  http://www.neuracpt.com/pdfs/Marie%20Claire%20Cover%20March%202012.pdf



Motion Stability is Offering a Course! by Motion Stability

Available to all residents, fellows, physical therapists! Please see the link below for more information:

http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Janda-Course–August-25-26–2012—Atlanta–GA.html?soid=1101912448556&aid=INbaMINud4w.