Motion Stability's Blog


Stretches for the Lower Back by charlestlee

image source: nzwomansweekly.co

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

Pelvic tilts: Laying on your back with knees bent – rock your pelvis back – flattening your back against the bed and return to neutral, and if it doesn’t bother you progress to arching your back a small amount. Oscillate back and forth.

Knee to chest: Bring one knee up to your chest, stretching your hip and your back. You can progress to both knees to your chest.

Trunk rotation: Laying on your back with knees bent and together slowly let you knees go to one side – allowing your trunk to rotate. Switch to the other side. If that does not bother you, you can progress to have one leg straight and let the other knee hook over it – allowing the spine to rotate more. There should be a slow stretch in your spine.

Cat / Camels: On your hand and knees – you can arch your low back up and down. Focus on a slow stretch trying to move from your lower back and pelvis. Many times people arch their backs but move mostly from the mid-back or thoracic spine, which does not stretch the lower back as well.

Prayer stretch: On your hand and knees – sit your bottom down to your heels and reach out along the ground with your arms to stretch your lower back. Take your arms and trunk side to side to feel more of a stretch along your sides of your back as well.

Stretching should not increase your back pain or other symptoms you are experiencing. Please recognize as well that stretching, in certain cases, may be detrimental to your condition. Please consult with a qualified health practitioner, such as a Physical Therapist, to determine the proper stretching progressions.

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Play Golf? Avoid Lower Back Pain With These Stretches. by charlestlee

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

There are numerous studies that have come out recently that show the loss of lead leg internal rotation of the hip in the golf swing has a high prevelance of low back pain in golfers. This is due to the lead leg in the golf swing acting as your swivel / finishing point in the swing. With limitations in the hip, the back has to work harder to finsh the swing. 

You should work on the foam roll to loosen the lead leg hip musculature, knee to chest and pirformis stretches can also help.

Standard back stretches can help alleviate your back after golf, but consider the causitive reasons why your back is hurting in the first place. I work at a Nike Golf Performance Center called Terminus Club (www.terminusclub.com) we utilize 3D Motion Capture Reality systems to analyze your swing, as well as utilize a Physical Therapist to determine the physical limitations of the body. From there we tailor your swing based upon who you are as an individual and not just the way a PGA Tour swings.



Custom Orthotics and Low Back Pain by charlestlee

image source: doctorsorthotics.com

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

The way the foot contacts the ground significantly affects the way your back absorbs compression to the spine. People who are flat foot footed can lead to decreased hip stability and motion. This is due to the foot not being able to provide proper support each time you step or stand on them. Over time the entire leg musculature, most importantly in the gluteal muscles lose their ability to provide proper support. This can lead to increased stress to the back…like jamming your thumb into a wall a thousand times over…you back gets ‘jammed’ or compressed.

Proper orthotic fitting can help the feet be placed in better alignment and thus provide proper support for the rest of the legs and ultimately the spine to be in a more efficient position to function during the day.

You should also consider that the bottom of the feet are highly sensitive with proprioceptive receptors..which detect spacial awareness. If the foot has better sense of its position, typically the rest of the body will also have better proprioception and spatial stability. It is thought that poor proprioception can make people more susceptible to injury. Orthotics can provide better proprioception.

There are many theories of how orthotics should be made. Please consult with various health practitioners to see what their opinions are about the design of the orthoses.



Stretches for lower back pain? by charlestlee

image source: teraputics.com

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

The most common muscle that is strained on the side of your back is the quadratus lumborum (QL). The QL attaches from the side and bottom of your rib cage to the top of your pelvis. There is a right and left QL and when it contracts its side bends your spine, as well as extends the back.

Lets say your right QL feels tight – to stretch this:

1. While sitting place a thick book or half foam roll under your opposite / left hip.

2. Lean to the left, away from your painful side, fulcruming over the roll and left hip.

3. Slightly bend forward and rotate towards the right. Keep your right hip bone on the seat.

4. You should feel a nice stretch on the right side where the QL muscle is.

This stretch should not cause increased back pain or nerve symptoms down the leg. Please consult with a qualified health practitioner to display proper technique.