Motion Stability's Blog


What Can I Do to Prevent an ACL Injury? by charlestlee

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

An ACL injury is usually due to the knee going into excessive valgus (knee turning inwards) and/or some type of rotary /pivot force. Many people focus on training the musculature around the knee such as the quad and hamstrings. This does help, but one must also consider the stability of the joints above and below – which would be the hips and ankle/foot complex.The knee can be viewed as a junction between two different stilts. If the hip is not stable or has excessive mobility, or the foot / ankle is not supportive such as excessive flat feet or stiff ankles from an old ankle sprain – it can place excessive valgus force at the knee – possibly leading to increased stress to the ACL.
Training thus should consist of hip and thigh training that does not promote internal rotation/valgus to the knee – such as gluteus medius / lateral hip stabilization, as well as improving ankle mobility/foot stability exercises. Once proper movement patterns are established, progression to higher level plyometrics, as well as sports specific training should be introduced.

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What can I do for knee pain? by charlestlee

image source: specialistpainphysio.com

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

Treating knee pain depends on the location and severity of the symptoms. If it is swollen, you should apply cold packs, compress, and elevate it to reduce swelling. You should consider contacting a qualified physician or physical therapist to assess your injury. 

If things are clear for any significant injury – and as swelling calms – determining where the location of knee pain helps guide things you can do to treat it.

Commonly pain is in either behind the knee cap or along the inside border. You may get a diagnosis of chondromalcia patella or patelofemoral pain which indicates that your knee cap is not tracking correctly along its groove. And with this pain, and most other types of knee pain – the pain usually originates from poor lower extremity mechanics, not just at the knee itself but at the hip and foot as well.

You have to look at the knee as a junction between two different stilts, one from above from the hip and femur, and one from below from the ankle/foot and shin. If the hip and/or ankle/foot are do not have the proper strength or flexibility many times the knee suffers increased stress and torque to it.

Exercises are then based on not only getting the knee stronger – but also improving the flexibility/strength of the entire leg.



Besides squats, are there other hip exercises to help my knee pain? by charlestlee

image source: primephysique.com

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

If you’re experiencing knee pain, especially with weightbearing exercises, its best to train the hip in non-weightbearing. This would include bridges to strengthen the gluteus maximus, and side leg raises/clam shells to stabilize the gluteus medius. Focus on improving the gluteus medius without overcompensating with the lateral quadriceps or tensor fascia latae muscles.
Once pain decreases in the knee, weightbearing exercises to improve hip stability can then be applied.


Do Your Knees Hurt After Jogging? by charlestlee

Image Source: healthyliving.azcentral.com

Post by Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

It is common for joggers to have knee pain. It is usually due to a combination of improper strength and flexibility not only at the knee, but also the hip and foot. The hip is designed to absorb a majority of shock, as well as produce power through the gluteal muscles. The foot contacts the ground and provides proper ground reaction forces up the kinetic chain. If the hip or foot do not work correctly, the knee undergoes increased stress. Like a paper clip bending repetitively, injuries at the knee can then occur. In runners, pain can present itself in the front (i.e. patellar pain), outside (i.e. iliotibial band syndrome), or along the inside of knee (i.e. medial meniscus injury). It is important to address proper mechanics through the entire leg to allow a jogger to run efficiently without causing further injury.

If running is causing more pain in the knee, it is recommended not to “run through the pain” but rather limit the running by staying short of pain before it gets worse. Take the time outside of running to address proper strength, flexibility and core stability to promote proper mechanics to jog at the distance and intensity you are striving for.  Fitting of proper running shoes for your foot type should be considered as well as contacting a running coach to assess your stride and running mechanics.