Motion Stability's Blog


Natural Nerve Pain Treatments by charlestlee

image source: espaifisioterapeutes.com

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

In Physical Therapy, nerve pain can be treated naturally through techniques called ‘neurodynamics’. According to a colleague of mine, Michael Shacklock in Australia, there are three major areas to address. This includes the mechanical impingement sites, the nerve itself, and the tissue the nerve innervates.

First, nerve pain can be caused by a tissue that pinches on it. This could be a herniated disc, a muscle spasm, or arthritic changes in the spine. Such treatments as mechanical traction or soft tissue massage around the pinched area of the nerve can alleviate the nerve pain.

Second, the nerve itself can become injured. Physical Therapists use manual therapy techniques to mobilize the nerve itself to reduce its pain and improve it mobility. Similar to having a knee surgery, it is important to calm the swelling and pain down while progressively improving the range of motion back to its normal length. Nerve is just as much of a connective tissue as ligaments or tendons are.

Lastly, when nerve pain occurs it becomes inflamed, a term called neurogenic inflammation. Like a hose spraying with water, when the nerve is inflamed it sends inflammation to its termination sites – such as muscle, joint, or ligaments. It is important to improve muscle or joint restrictions that surround the nerve to fully treat the nerve pain and its residual effects.

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Stretches for the Lower Back by charlestlee

image source: nzwomansweekly.co

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

Pelvic tilts: Laying on your back with knees bent – rock your pelvis back – flattening your back against the bed and return to neutral, and if it doesn’t bother you progress to arching your back a small amount. Oscillate back and forth.

Knee to chest: Bring one knee up to your chest, stretching your hip and your back. You can progress to both knees to your chest.

Trunk rotation: Laying on your back with knees bent and together slowly let you knees go to one side – allowing your trunk to rotate. Switch to the other side. If that does not bother you, you can progress to have one leg straight and let the other knee hook over it – allowing the spine to rotate more. There should be a slow stretch in your spine.

Cat / Camels: On your hand and knees – you can arch your low back up and down. Focus on a slow stretch trying to move from your lower back and pelvis. Many times people arch their backs but move mostly from the mid-back or thoracic spine, which does not stretch the lower back as well.

Prayer stretch: On your hand and knees – sit your bottom down to your heels and reach out along the ground with your arms to stretch your lower back. Take your arms and trunk side to side to feel more of a stretch along your sides of your back as well.

Stretching should not increase your back pain or other symptoms you are experiencing. Please recognize as well that stretching, in certain cases, may be detrimental to your condition. Please consult with a qualified health practitioner, such as a Physical Therapist, to determine the proper stretching progressions.



Shin Pain When Running? by charlestlee

image source: kttape.com

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

Shin splints are very common in runners. It is usually due to some type of muscular imbalance such as tight calves, poor glute strength, and possibly poor footwear and running mechanics. Please consult with a Physical Therapist and also a running coach to assess your mechanics.



What Exercises Can Help to Alleviate My Lower Back Pain? by charlestlee

image source: lakeviewchiropractic.net

Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

Usually low grade/oscillatory exercises can help alleviate low back pain. This includes stretches such as knees to chest, knees side to side/trunk rotation, prone press ups (like a Cobra position in yoga), pelvic tilts/clocks. Please consult with a qualified health practitioner to assess your causes of low back pain to then develop a proper exercise program.



What are the treatment options for back pain? by charlestlee
Brian Yee PT, MPhty, OCS, FAAOMPT

Accurate diagnosis of the sources of back pain will indicate the type of treatment you should receive. However, after structural reasons of back pain have been ruled out (such as a herniated disc), the majority of patients are diagnosed with ‘non-specific low back pain’. 

What we find clinically is that traditional interventions such as medications and injections, although perhaps needed and based on a physician’s recommendation, provide short-term relief.

There is growing research and clinical attention on trying to diagnose or sub-group ‘non-specific low back pain’. This can include movement dysfunction, fascial restrictions, muscle control dysfunction, myofascial trigger points, psychosocial variables, pelvic pain, nerve referred pain, or internal/systemic issues such as referred pain from internal organs or hormonal/vitamin deficiencies.

It is important to find a clinician that is able to differentially diagnose the various contributing factors of back pain, and then be able to provide effective treatment for those sources – and then coordinate with other practitioners that can address other needed areas. Especially in chronic low back pain management, a multi-disciplinary team of health practitioners is usually needed.